The Kooks mature with latest LP ‘Lets Go Sunshine’

Album Review Review
9.1

ICM Rating

9.1

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Hailing as one of the best bands to come out of the noughties indie music scene, The Kooks have always been a band that can deliver the goods. Their debut album is lined with killer tracks such as, ‘She Moves In Her Own Way’, ‘Ohh La’ and ‘Naive’, all of which continue to dominate indie clubs up and down the country. Their next few albums, ‘Konk’, ‘Junk Of The Heart’ and ‘Listen’ do have some outstanding tracks such as ‘Junk Of The Heart (Happy)’ and live-favourites ‘Forgive and Forget’ and ‘Down’, although the hits have been few and far between in recent years.

In my opinion, when artists create albums, they can either make the LP cater more to pleasing existing fans or create the album to gain more fans with commercial-success-ready bangers. It’s not a black and white rule of course, although my point is that The Kooks have always seemed to sway more to the latter.  The only problem is that the albums didn’t gain huge commercial success, and therefore, what I really admire about the latest album, ‘Let’s Go Sunshine’, is that it sounds as though it was created with only existing fans in mind.

It collectively brings the bands unique writing styles, noughties chant-like lyrics and infectious drum beats to light, but in a more relaxed, mature sound. This album will be a disappointment to those who expect the same raucous attitude that comes across in ‘Matchbox’ – “The Kooks are out in the streets, Oh we’re gonna steal your signs”. But to those who have been waiting for The Kooks to develop into a band that can then create an album for those chilled afternoons, then here it is. ‘Let’s Go Sunshine’ provokes contemplative thoughts. It’s diverse. Colourful in a yet monotone perception – fun but in a responsible way. By no means is it boring, it’s just not an album for teenagers anymore. It’s for the more intellectual music consumers.

Having released five singles for the album, you would assume that the album is pretty clearly mapped out, but I’d have to disagree. The singles all possess that infectious hook with catchy vocal tones, but digging deeper into the album with tracks such as, ‘Tesco Disco’ and ‘Initials for Gainsbourg’, you start to see the often forgotten poetic lyricism from the lads. Then the intro to the album followed by ultimate song, ‘No Pressure’ brings the whole album together as one very well thought out work of art.

‘Let’s Go Sunshine’ is definitely up there as one of their best albums. It’s the lovestruck classic displaying how unrigid the indie genre really is. Bringing multiple influences from their entire career, it summarises exactly who they are and what the band is about. Dreampop, epic glam, indie rock, balladry with hints of funk, ‘Let’s Go Sunshine, is all about the exploration than exceeding demands.

Good

  • A ture exploration of the indie genre
  • A great summary of The Kooks career to date
  • Poetic and balladry with hints at noughties chant-like indie.

Bad

  • The released singles did not show the album's diversity

Summary

It collectively brings the bands unique writing styles, noughties chant-like lyrics and infectious drum beats to light, but in a more relaxed, mature sound. This album will be a disappointment to those who expect the same raucous attitude that comes across in 'Matchbox' - "The Kooks are out in the streets, Oh we're gonna steal your signs". But to those who have been waiting for The Kooks to develop into a band that can then create an album for those chilled afternoons, then here it is. 'Let's Go Sunshine' provokes contemplative thoughts. It's diverse. Colourful in a yet monotone perception - fun but in a responsible way. By no means is it boring, it's just not an album for teenagers anymore. It's for the more intellectual music consumers.
9.1

ICM Rating