Honey Lung

An introduction to Honey Lung

From the London Borough of Harrow, Honey Lung was picked as our ones to watch out for this year coming off the back of their successful debut EP ‘Kind Of Alone’. Four buddies Jamie, Omri, Charlie and David prepare themselves for an array of music festivals including Reading and Leeds. We had a quick chat with the band before their first show at Hoxton Square with Close Up Promotions.

Tell us about your aims when creating music, and where does that aim stem from?
Our biggest aim with writing music is creating meaningful songs. Music is our form of expressing ourselves and the last thing we want to do is be insincere.

What was the catalyst for picking up instruments and wanting to start a band?
None of us can really see ourselves doing anything but playing and writing music.

Were you very influential to music when growing up or did you establish your own musical preferences?
A mix of both, we all grew up listening to the hits, but I guess we have factored in more niche music as the years have gone on.

Tell us about what it was like when you first started writing?
Writing was difficult and still is. Its never easy creating something original and good.

What’s the music scene like in London at the moment? Any band recommendations?
Check out Lady Pocket, insane live band.

You’re playing at Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen on Friday (18th) for Close Up Promotions, have you got anything special lined up?
For that show? Well, its the first gig were playing for our end of year tour. Getting us nice and warmed up for gigs to come.

What and who influences you musically?
Artists like Alex G, Elliott Smith, Dinosaur JR. I’d say we listen to a lot of music that doesn’t necessarily sound like us but influences our songwriting in less obvious ways.

Describe your song-writing process?
Generally I’ll write the core of the song (Jamie) and then we’ll flesh it out in the room or recording studio.

What was it like recording your latest single ‘Sophomore’?
Exciting, it really developed in the studio and we didn’t see it sounding as big as it did.

Although you are in a band, do you still have to work day jobs in-between live shows?
Of course, it’s really hard to make rent on music alone

How would you like people to respond to your music? Do you wish to connect emotionally with the audience or is it just about having a party?
Emotionally. Its weird because we don’t play any slow numbers live. It’s something were working on.

Do you ever see your sound changing from the type of indie rock you write?
Definitely. I would say we are writing with more purpose than ever before.

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